Coast Lifestyle

THE HEART KNOWS WHAT THE HEART KNOWS

Old Blues Eyes had it figured out.

Frank Sinatra’s 1956 tune “You Make Me Feel So Young” hits all the right notes. It starts with a blasting horn line underscored with soothing strings and a walking bassline guaranteed to get your fingers snapping. And then Sinatra lends his voice to one of his all-time greats.

It’s about a young man swooning in love with his new lady friend. When he is with her, he’s unstoppable. She gives him the strength to bounce the moon just like a toy balloon. All he wants to do is pick flowers with her and spend every moment together. And it ends with the perfect message: “And even when I’m old and grey, I’m gonna feel the way I do today.”

It’s a wonderful message and hopefully one we’re all lucky enough to feel just once in our lives.

Bells to be Rung and Songs to be Sung

Evidence shows being in love may elevate your heart’s health. It’s more than running through meadows picking lots of forget-me-nots (although this is a good cardiovascular activity). People in committed relationships actually have improved heart health.

A recent study in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health followed 620 married fathers and found that those who were in flourishing marriages experienced improvements in several cardiovascular risk factors, including cholesterol and body mass index (BMI). Comparing those in happy relationships to ones that deteriorated over time, happy relationships showed lower rates of high blood pressure. The report suggests several reasons why people in healthy relationships tend to have fewer health issues. It starts with the social support offered by each partner.

Those in happy relationships encourage the other to take care of themselves, provide care, and cheer on new, healthy behaviors.

Men seem to benefit more from these relationships. The study found that men in happy relationships have better health outcomes, including fewer hospitalizations, fewer severe disease, and less physical pain. The thinking behind this research suggests people who have partners who can share things are more likely to address problems sooner than later. Those in harmful relationships are more likely to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can lead to arthritis, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

Every Time I See You Grin

The better the relationship, the bigger the payoff. Harvard Medical School published an article stating there are biological and behavioural benefits when people stay in long-term, happy relationships. Looking at over 309,000 subjects, they found people in solid relationships were less likely to suffer from “harmful levels of stress, which can adversely affect coronary arteries, gut function, insulin regulations, and the immune system.”

Essentially, the article encourages people to pursue healthy, couple-building activities. When you’re working toward common goals, you’re less likely to develop habits damaging to the relationship. Take care of your partner and they’ll take care of you.

Just as important as fostering a positive relationship is being conscious of the dangers of being in a negative relationship. An article published in the Journal of the American Heart Association suggests that partners who annoy you, demand too much, ignore you, or pressure you to do things you don’t want to do are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases.

It makes sense. When you’re feeling unvalued or neglected, you’re likely to develop resentment or depression. These stressful life events and other social strains are associated with early indicators of cardiovascular disease. By avoiding harmful relationships, you are mitigating the risk of developing unnecessary stress which can manifest in a number of health issues.

Tips for Good Heart Health

  1. Get exercise 
  2. Drink plenty of water 
  3. Eat healthy foods 
  4. Get good sleep

East Coast Life Solutions product partner with USANA Health Sciences. We are passionate health influencers, sharing a message of prioritizing self-care and making it a habit.

Coast Lifestyle, Healthy Cove

BACK TO HEART HEALTH BASICS

That heart-shaped sugar cookie tastes great around Valentine’s Day. But is it the best thing for your heart?

Sweets and chocolates are surefire ways to show the people you love you’re thinking of them during the most romantic month of the year, but if you really love somebody, you’ll give them a bouquet of kale.

The problem is most people don’t get a second date when they gift cruciferous vegetables.

A healthy diet and regular exercise are the best ways to strengthen and protect your heart, not just in February, but all year long. As we enter Heart Health Month, here are some thought-provoking articles on the best ways to show your heart how much you care.

Feed Your Ticker

Good heart health starts with a good diet. But do you know what kinds of foods your heart needs to work at optimal levels? Check out this great article on the importance of macro and micronutrition to support the muscle that supports you.

We Got the Beat

The heart meets the challenges your body throws at it. But what’s the optimal level of beats per minute? If you’re working out, your heart is going to beat faster compared to sitting on the couch watching television. Get in rhythm and find out your best heart rate.

A Lovely Combination

A balanced diet and exercise are fantastic to support your heart and adding key nutrients to your diet can promote your healthy heart. Try adding USANA’s premier heart health supplement, Proflavanol® C100, to your daily routine. Made with grape-seed extract and vitamin C, Proflavanol C100 has the nutrients you need to support your heart.*

Get Moving

One of the best ways to protect your heart is regular exercise, five times a week for 30 minutes. And it doesn’t have to be triathlon training. There are lots of ways to get your heart rate up, from jogging to lifting weights to going for a swim. Get motivated and get your heart rate up with these simple tips for better health.

Fuel Your Powerhouse

Try saying coenzyme Q10 five times fast. Not easy, is it? This tongue twister is a superstar at helping your heart with the nutrients needs to support your cardiovascular system. Learn the science behind coenzyme Q10 and how it helps your heart.

Power Your Heart

Now you know what coenzyme Q10 does for your heart, you’re probably curious how to fuel your cells. That means you’re ready for CoQuinone® 30. Formulated with a well-absorbed form of coenzyme Q10 with alpha-lipoic acid for maximum benefits, CoQuinone 30 gives your cellular power plants the charge they need to stay energized. Discover what CoQuinone 30 can do for you.*

Valentine’s Day might only come once a year, but good heart health is something you should celebrate every day. Treat your cardiovascular system with a smart diet, get plenty of exercise, and promote your heart health with CoQuinone 30.* Tell us in the comment section how you help your heart and give your best tips for strengthening the most important muscle in your body.

 

Order Proflavanol

Order CoQuinone

*THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.