Coast Lifestyle

dōTERRA Cheer® Uses and Benefits

Cheer

doTERRA Cheer Product Description
With a bright, fresh aroma, doTERRA Cheer Uplifting Blend was designed to help promote optimistic feelings while counteracting negative emotions that naturally occur in everyday life. When you are feeling down or blue, doTERRA Cheer essential oil blend is waiting to help promote feelings of optimism, cheerfulness and emotional well-being.

Where to Buy doTERRA Cheer
Are you ready to experience the benefits of the doTERRA Cheer Uplifting Blend? Visit the doTERRA Cheer essential oil blend page for information about ordering. As part of the doTERRA Emotional Aromatherapy System, doTERRA Cheer has been formulated with CPTG® essential oils that are designed to help the user deal with negative emotions. Allow the fresh aroma and warming properties of doTERRA Cheer brighten your day as you put pessimistic feelings to rest, and let a little more sunshine into your life.
doTERRA Cheer Benefits and Uses
  1. When tensions rise or overwhelming feelings abound, diffusing doTERRA Cheer can help promote an uplifting and positive environment. Try diffusing doTERRA Cheer in a classroom to promote positivity among students. Put a few drops of doTERRA Cheer in your diffuser at home to help your family enjoy the fresh, warm scent that will help create an inviting, happy environment. Diffuse doTERRA Cheer at your desk or in your home office when you need a little pick-me-up.
  2. Wish you could carry the bright smell of doTERRA Cheer around with you all day? Experience the uplifting, happy scent of doTERRA Cheer while driving by applying a few drops of the essential oil to a terra cotta plate or even to a cotton ball and placing it in your car. As you run errands, make your morning commute, or drive the kids around, you’ll have the lovely scent of doTERRA Cheer as your companion, keeping your spirits bright all day long.
  3. Feeling lonely? When you are alone, don’t let heavy feelings weigh you down and discourage you—diffuse doTERRA Cheer in your favorite essential oil diffuser to promote happy, bright feelings that will invigorate your mood.
  4. When negative emotions creep into your day, consider applying one drop of doTERRA Cheer to your hands, rub the palms together, and take a deep breath to inhale the comforting, warm scent of the oil. The scent will linger, so you can cup your hands over your nose or mouth throughout the day and inhale doTERRA Cheer for an added dose of optimism.
  5. Have a friend, neighbor, or loved one who has been feeling down lately? If someone close to you has been feeling discouraged, consider giving them a “box of sunshine” care package. Gather items that will cheer them up to include in the care package—you can even make all of the items yellow, so that everything is bright and happy. You can include things like a yellow journal for them to write in, a yellow blanket or pillow case, and of course, yellow-labeled doTERRA Cheer. This care package will bring comfort to anyone who might be struggling, or who needs a boost of love and sunshine.
  6. Looking for a good diffuser blend that uses doTERRA Cheer essential oil? Combine three drops of doTERRA Cheer, one drop of Douglas Fir, and one drop of Wild Orange to your diffuser for an uplifting, invigorating blend. If you have a friend who could use a little pick-me-up, consider giving them a bottle of doTERRA Cheer with a list of ideas for elevating diffuser blends that will lift their spirits.
  7. If you tend to feel grumpy or discouraged in the morning, try diffusing doTERRA Cheer while doing your morning yoga, drinking your morning tea, or reading the morning paper to help promote feelings of optimism as you start the day.
Ingredients 
  • Wild Orange Peel
  • Clove Bud
  • Star Anise Fruit/Seed
  • Lemon Myrtle Leaf
  • Nutmeg Kernel
  • Vanilla Bean Extract
  • Ginger Rhizome
  • Cinnamon Bark
  • Zdravetz Herb
Chemistry of doTERRA Cheer 
doTERRA Cheer is made up of citrus and spice essential oils, which contribute to its warm, inviting aroma. Like the rest of the oils in the doTERRA Emotional Aromatherapy System, doTERRA Cheer was specifically and chemically constructed to bring light and sunshine into dark or dreary days.
Cautions
Possible skin sensitivity. Keep out of reach of children. If pregnant or under a doctor’s care, consult your physician. Avoid contact with the eyes, inner ears, and sensitive areas. Avoid sunlight or UV rays for up to 12 hours after applying the product.
Ordering Information:

If you are interested in purchasing Cheer or any other doTERRA essential oil click on the

shop and you will be taken to the site – select the country of your choice – on the shop bar

select SHOP and select oils – FYI CHEER is a Blend (all oils are in alphabetical order) Place your order and your essential oils will be shipped directly to you. It’s quick and easy, the shipping is modest.

If you are interested in becoming a Wholesale Customer, you can sign up at No Charge and receive 25% savings off of every purchase. or if you wish to Enroll and go on the Loyalty Reward Program, you will not only save 25% but you will earn free oils and be eligible for monthly savings.  If you are overwhelmed by online ordering, I would love to help you find and receive the product(s) you are interested.

Go to the Contact Us on our website at http://www.eastcoastlifesolutions.com
Coast Lifestyle

BOOST YOUR CONFIDENCE WITH 4 SUMMER SKINCARE TIPS

Your Instagram feed is bursting with sun bathers, pool parties, and warm hiking trails. Snapping plenty of summertime selfies is great until you’re too self-conscious to post anything because your skin looks like a juicy tomato instead of a radiant glow.

Radiant and Protected Is the Ultimate Skin Goal

As you enjoy summer days, your skin can suffer from too much sun exposure. Skin damage appears as discoloration, a change in texture, and even blisters or dark blemishes. Our skin protects us, but it’s a fragile barrier we need to nourish.

Although a sun-kissed glow makes skipping makeup a breeze, it doesn’t mean you should get lax with your skincare routine. Soak in these four summer skincare tips to keep you glowing and help you maintain your beautiful selfie skin.

The Good, The Bad, and The Sunshine Vitamin

Sunshine can feel invigorating and brighten your mood thanks to the powerful vitamins in its rays. Vitamin D enriches our bodies with so much goodness there’s a reason it’s called the sunshine vitamin.

That being said, your skin can easily get burned, flushed, and irritated from the dangerous side effects of the sun. Going on a date, or giving a presentation at work, with your face peeling or flaking is sure to make anyone self-conscious. There’s even an increased risk of skin problems, and possibly skin diseases, if your skin is exposed to too much sun over the years.

4 Summer Skincare Tips: Lady with hat

Make sure you’re using a moisturizer in your summer skincare regimen with at least a 15 SPF to keep your skin moisturized and protected each day. The skin on your lips is ultra-sensitive to the sunshine, so pick up a chap stick or lip balm made with UV protection to keep them kissable. If you use a product with a higher SPF, you won’t need to reapply it as often.

Get Shady to Save Your Skin

I have very fair skin that freckles rather than tans. Just 15 minutes outside with my skin unprotected, and I get sunburned. If you forgot to apply sunscreen before heading out the door, there are several hideouts for your skin if you’re caught outside without UV protection.

Keep your skin glowing while still enjoying the fresh air.

  • Keep a wide brim hat or baseball cap in your trunk
  • Choose umbrella-covered seating
  • Host a dinner party under your covered patio
  • Wear light-weight, breathable cotton long-sleeved shirts

Your skin can keep its summer glow if you’re careful about how long it’s in the sunshine.

Hello Hydration, Goodbye Lackluster Skin

4 Summer Skincare Tips: Water Bottle

No one wants to look like a dry piece of coral at the beach. While you’re out enjoying the long summer days, remember to keep hydrated . Your skin loses moisture more quickly when there’s a heat wave. If your skin loses moisture, it’s bound to look older and lackluster.
It can become so dried out and flaky you may want to hide behind oversized sunglasses and a scarf all day.

Drinking plenty of water is easier than you think. Pack plenty of H2O to take to with you on summer activities. Throw a few water bottles in your beach bag or pack a small cooler the next time you spend the afternoon soaking in sun rays. By staying hydrated, you’ll have more energy to enjoy the day—and look good doing it.

Get Summer Strong

Summer is the perfect time to change your daily workout scenery. Go for a jog around the neighborhood, bike to the park, or hit up your local tennis or basketball court. I love going to my local water aerobics class to exercise outside. Your skin will probably sweat a little more in the higher temperatures. I always joke with my friends that I “sparkle” May through July. But if you’re drinking extra water as a part of your new, outside summer skincare routine, you’ll likely keep your supple summer glow.

4 Summer Skincare Tips Infographic Get #SkinConfident

Rub in your SPF, drop some lemon in your water bottle, grab your tennis racket, and take on this summer with simple skincare tips to keep you glowing. By taking care of your skin, your body will shine with vitamin D and you’ll rock this summer with stellar confidence.

Coast Lifestyle

INTERMITTENT FASTING: THE SCIENCE OF GOING WITHOUT

Intermittent Fasting: Feature Photo

If you’ve recently had a conversation about dieting and weight management, then you’ve probably heard talk of intermittent fasting. But what is intermittent fasting? And is it healthy? Currently, this is quite an under-researched topic, with limited research in humans.

In other words, the answer is a little complicated, but let’s break it down together.

The Science of Going Without

Intermittent fasting is an eating pattern where you cycle between periods of eating and fasting. It’s a way to manage your weight and promote overall health, not by limiting what you eat, but by limiting when you eat.

There are several different intermittent fasting methods, such as:

  • Daily intermittent fasting: 16-hour fast followed by an eight-hour eating period each day.
  • Alternate day intermittent fasting: Cycle between 24-hour periods of eating and fasting.
  • The 5-2 method, eat regularly for five days during the week and restrict food during 2 days to about 500 to 600 calories during the fasting days.

How does intermittent fasting work? To put it simply, when your body is digesting food, it’s in the “fed state.” This typically lasts three to five hours after your last meal. During this state, your body doesn’t burn fat as efficiently because your insulin levels are high and you are getting needed energy from food.

But if you don’t eat for around eight to 12 hours after your last meal, your body will enter the “fasted state.” Your insulin levels are low because your body has stopped absorbing food and, as a result, your body burns stored food energy (fat) more easily.Intermittent Fasting: Scale

The Pros and Cons

So we know what intermittent fasting is and what it does, but the real questions are—is it healthy? Is it safe? Is it something you should do?

Your body is unique. And so is everyone else’s. Many people have tried intermittent fasting with great results, and they happily want to share their success with others.

But for many people, intermittent fasting is not the answer they’re looking for. For some people, it could even be a danger to their long-term health.

Let’s look at just a few of the many possible pros and cons of incorporating intermittent fasting into your daily life.

Pros:

  • Promotes health and weight management. Some studies show intermittent fasting may be a promising way to lose weight and improve metabolic health.
  • No calorie counting. With intermittent fasting, you don’t have to change what you eat in order to stay under your daily calories. By controlling when you eat, you have the freedom to eat what you want.
  • It’s simple. Intermittent fasting makes your day simpler. When on a fasting program, you plan for and cook less meals. Some people find this simplicity liberating, as they have more time to devote to other activities they love.

Cons:

  • Dropout rate is high. Recent studies show people may be more likely to quit an intermittent fasting routine before it can provide any real benefit to their health.
  • You could develop bad eating habits. Intermittent fasting can be very stressful for some people. This, coupled with a lack of satisfaction, means they end up eating much more than they should during non-fasting periods.
  • Dangerous for people with certain conditions. While safe for most people, intermittent fasting can have negative effects if you have diabetes, are pregnant or breastfeeding, or take certain medications. Make sure to always consult your physician before introducing any fasting routine or change in diet as part of your everyday life.

The Choice Is Yours

Intermittent Fasting: Plate

At the end of the day, there is not yet enough scientific evidence to prove or disprove intermittent fasting as superior to traditional dieting, nor to prove or disprove it promotes long-term health better than counting calories. On the flip side, there also isn’t any strong evidence it’s harmful to average adults, either.

If you have the willpower for an intermittent fasting routine, then more power to you. If not, there’s nothing wrong with a more traditional method of weight management.

Research is ongoing and, hopefully, we’ll soon know the benefit of intermittent fasting. Until then, the best diet is one you can maintain consistently—along with plenty of exercise.

 

Click here for more fun and useful articles on proper nutrition and healthy dieting.

Coast Lifestyle

WHOLE FRUIT VS. FRUIT JUICE: A FRUIT STUDY INFOGRAPHIC

We all know the saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” and a study led by USANA scientist, Dr. Jessie Nicodemus Johnson, shows why it’s a good idea to heed that advice. The study shows that eating whole fruit provides different benefits to the body versus drinking fruit juice. Although juice consumption may help with vitamin and mineral absorption, the immune system pathways associated with juice consumption are different than that of the humble whole fruit consumer, likely because the fiber in whole fruit is regulating what and when different compounds that are consumed are taken into the body.


Read the full study here.

Coast Lifestyle

Intermittent Fasting: The Science of Going Without

Intermittent Fasting: Feature Photo

If you’ve recently had a conversation about dieting and weight management, then you’ve probably heard talk of intermittent fasting. But what is intermittent fasting? And is it healthy? Currently, this is quite an under-researched topic, with limited research in humans.

In other words, the answer is a little complicated, but let’s break it down together.

The Science of Going Without

Intermittent fasting is an eating pattern where you cycle between periods of eating and fasting. It’s a way to manage your weight and promote overall health, not by limiting what you eat, but by limiting when you eat.

There are several different intermittent fasting methods, such as:

  • Daily intermittent fasting: 16-hour fast followed by an eight-hour eating period each day.
  • Alternate day intermittent fasting: Cycle between 24-hour periods of eating and fasting.
  • The 5-2 method, eat regularly for five days during the week and restrict food during 2 days to about 500 to 600 calories during the fasting days.

How does intermittent fasting work? To put it simply, when your body is digesting food, it’s in the “fed state.” This typically lasts three to five hours after your last meal. During this state, your body doesn’t burn fat as efficiently because your insulin levels are high and you are getting needed energy from food.

But if you don’t eat for around eight to 12 hours after your last meal, your body will enter the “fasted state.” Your insulin levels are low because your body has stopped absorbing food and, as a result, your body burns stored food energy (fat) more easily.Intermittent Fasting: Scale

The Pros and Cons

So we know what intermittent fasting is and what it does, but the real questions are—is it healthy? Is it safe? Is it something you should do?

Your body is unique. And so is everyone else’s. Many people have tried intermittent fasting with great results, and they happily want to share their success with others.

But for many people, intermittent fasting is not the answer they’re looking for. For some people, it could even be a danger to their long-term health.

Let’s look at just a few of the many possible pros and cons of incorporating intermittent fasting into your daily life.

Pros:

  • Promotes health and weight management. Some studies show intermittent fasting may be a promising way to lose weight and improve metabolic health.
  • No calorie counting. With intermittent fasting, you don’t have to change what you eat in order to stay under your daily calories. By controlling when you eat, you have the freedom to eat what you want.
  • It’s simple. Intermittent fasting makes your day simpler. When on a fasting program, you plan for and cook less meals. Some people find this simplicity liberating, as they have more time to devote to other activities they love.

Cons:

  • Dropout rate is high. Recent studies show people may be more likely to quit an intermittent fasting routine before it can provide any real benefit to their health.
  • You could develop bad eating habits. Intermittent fasting can be very stressful for some people. This, coupled with a lack of satisfaction, means they end up eating much more than they should during non-fasting periods.
  • Dangerous for people with certain conditions. While safe for most people, intermittent fasting can have negative effects if you have diabetes, are pregnant or breastfeeding, or take certain medications. Make sure to always consult your physician before introducing any fasting routine or change in diet as part of your everyday life.

The Choice Is Yours

Intermittent Fasting: Plate

At the end of the day, there is not yet enough scientific evidence to prove or disprove intermittent fasting as superior to traditional dieting, nor to prove or disprove it promotes long-term health better than counting calories. On the flip side, there also isn’t any strong evidence it’s harmful to average adults, either.

If you have the willpower for an intermittent fasting routine, then more power to you. If not, there’s nothing wrong with a more traditional method of weight management.

 

Research is ongoing and, hopefully, we’ll soon know the benefit of intermittent fasting. Until then, the best diet is one you can maintain consistently—along with plenty of exercise.

Coast Lifestyle

Essential Oils 101

ECLSEssential Oils 101 datefree

East Coast Life Solutions has regular Essential Oils 101 classes. These classes are fun and informative to give you quality information on how to use and experience oils safely for you and your family. Please check our Specials for up-to-date dates and locations. If you are so inclined, we can do a presentation in your home or for clubs and organizations.

 

What Are Essential Oils?

If you have ever enjoyed the scent of a rose, you’ve experienced the aromatic qualities of essential oils. These naturally occurring, volatile aromatic compounds are found in the seeds, bark, stems, roots, flowers, and other parts of plants. Essential oils provide plants with protection against environmental threats and play a role in plant pollination. In addition to their intrinsic benefits to plants and being beautifully fragrant to people, essential oils have long been used for food preparation, beauty treatment, and health-care practices.

How Do I Use Essential Oils?

Essential oils are used for a very wide range of emotional and physical wellness applications. They can be used a single oil at a time or in complex blends in one of three methods:

Aromatic

Certain essential oils, when diffused, can be very stimulating, while others can be calming and soothing. Diffusing essential oils can also cleanse and purify the air of unwanted odors.

Topical

Essential oils are easily absorbed by the skin and can be safely applied topically.

Internal

Certain essential oils have a rich culinary history and can be used as dietary supplements for targeted wellness.

Essential oils are both exciting and promising when it comes to taking care of your own and your family’s health. Whether you’re applying essential oils topically, enjoying the aromatic benefits through diffusing, or taking essential oils internally, the positive effects of essential oils are boundless.

That’s why you’ll want to ensure that the essential oils you are using are capable of delivering on their promise. You’ll want to make sure that you are choosing essential oils for their potency and their purity.

Frankincense
Frankincense
Lavender
Lavender
Lemon
Lemon
Melaleuca
Melaleuca
Oregano
Oregano
Breathe
dōTERRA BreatheTM
DigestZen
DigestZen®
On Guard
dōTERRA On Guard®
Deep Blue
Deep Blue®

There’s an Oil for That!

Coast Lifestyle

Is It Safe to Ingest Essential Oils?

Contributed by Dr. Joshua Yorgason, MD – Otolaryngologist (Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon)
Member of doTERRA Medical Advisory Board 

Introduction

 

Each type of oil contains a mixture of natural chemical compounds unique to that species of plant and to the environment in which the plant is grown. For thousands of years, humans have ingested plants in the form of food as well as plant parts and extracts as herbal health products and teas from leaves and flowers, which contain essential oils.

One could argue that it should also be safe to ingest essential oils in small quantities, just as we have been doing when ingesting plants containing essential oils. Because they are produced naturally by plants, essential oils are found in naturally balanced mixtures. Then why is there an ongoing concern about the internal use of essential oils? Internal use can not only be very effective, but is also safe.
Local Tissue

Oils first have an effect on local tissues. The local effect may be felt more strongly when applied internally compared to when applied to the skin because the nerves in the mucosa are closer to the surface, often more numerous, and can be more easily stimulated compared to the nerves in the skin. Although the skin is thicker and seems to be less fragile than the mucous membranes, the reality is that similar to the skin the mucosa has many features that are protective, and therefore conducive to the use of essential oils.

Like skin, the mucosa has many layers designed to protect the body against disease and toxic exposures. And similar to skin, the mucosa has an ability to constantly restore itself and to regenerate after harmful exposures, such as trauma from teeth or heat from foods that can cause ulceration.

The mucosa heals an open sore very quickly, so it can resume its protective function. The mucosa also has thousands of mucous glands that secrete mucous to create a protective film over the tissues. The mucous is continually being produced and continually migrating as the cilia beat, limiting any local exposure.
Mucosa Absorption

When essential oils contact the mucosa, they are absorbed to some degree at the initial point of contact, but much of the oil will be continually diluted by the mucous. Rapid absorption and constant dilution allow the oils to have a dramatic yet temporary effect, which explains why any sensation you have in the mouth or throat from essential oils taken internally is temporary. Because the mucosa is designed to be protective, essential oils can be safely used internally.

The premise of all of these discussions is that essential oils could be harmful when taken internally. However, studies suggest just the opposite. Essential oils may actually be protective to the mucosa. Many studies show that essential oils can have a positive effect when there is a problem with the stomach’s mucous membranes.* For example, limonene, found in citrus oils, was shown to help protect the stomach mucosa in a preclinical study.This protective effect was shown without affecting normal stomach acid secretion, gastrin enzyme secretion, or antioxidant glutathione production.3 Many other studies have also demonstrated similar effects.1–6*

Avoiding hot oils that may be irritating to the mucous membranes, using small single use amounts, or using less than the maximum daily amounts recommended, are all safe practices that can help us have confidence in using essential oils internally. If we are using the oils for a local effect, such as to soothe the mouth and throat, then the oils can be appropriately diluted. Internal use of essential oils may be the best method to help improve function of the gut and improve digestion, because the oils can get to the area of need.
Conclusion

Taking essential oils internally may be a very effective method to get the oils to be absorbed into the body to promote health and wellness, for an overall soothing effect on the body, and for a calming effect on mood. Using the appropriate amount of oils in Veggie Caps or prepackaged in the appropriate amounts in softgels can be an effective way to take essential oils internally so that they can be maximally absorbed by the gut for a whole body effect.

East Coast Life Solutions has two Wellness Advocation who are ready to serve you any time, if you have questions and need assistance in ordering.

Pop on over to our Upcoming Events pages and have a look at our regularly scheduled 101 Essential Oil Education class in our local area.

Coast Lifestyle

5 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling

5 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling: Feature

Whether it’s for business, fun, or family, we all pack for travel from time to time. From an overnight trip to that month-long adventure abroad, there’s a lot to bring along: bath and beauty products, clothing, chargers, the Kindle/iPad/Switch. But there’s one bit of travel prep many people dismiss until it’s too late: nutrition. In the hustle and bustle of packing, it’s easy to forget about hunger until it strikes.

Instead of perceiving food as just another hassle while on the go, it’s time to view nutrition as a tool to help you power through your trip. Let’s go over five tips for eating healthy while traveling.

Tip #1: Pack Your Staples / Shop When You Touch Down

When I’m daydreaming about my next vacation, I love to think about all of the delicious, decidedly unhealthy food I’m going to eat. There’s nothing wrong with looking forward to extravagant eating, but it’s important to balance these out with “staple” nutrition to keep your body in check. Consider the foods you eat often. Which are the healthiest? Bonus points if they don’t need to be refrigerated. For me, it’s roasted almonds and eggs. Plan a grocery list for your arrival at your destination and buy whatever’s reasonable for your accommodations.

Another travel concern is the number of new people, and germs, you’ll be coming into contact with. Even if you aren’t flying (and especially if you are), give your immune system a boost with a supplement such as Booster C 600™, which uses USANA’s propriety Poly C® complex to provide higher levels of vitamin C over time.* There’s nothing worse than getting sick on the first day of a sun-kissed cruise.

Tip #2: Enjoy Fresh, Local Cuisine

5 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling: Market

One of the best parts of visiting unfamiliar places is having the opportunity to experience local cuisine. Fruits, vegetables, cheeses, meats, all with their unique local flair. Skip the McDonald’s and head to a locally owned restaurant or, if you have the time and accommodations, make a trip to the local farmers market to stock up on fresh ingredients to craft your own meals.

Of course, you’re going to be eating and drinking things that are either a little, or a lot, out of the norm. This can mess with your belly’s biology, causing uncomfortable temporary bloating or other mild digestive issues. I always pack USANA® Digestive Enzyme to help maintain gut health and, hopefully, prevent the infamous “beached whale” feeling after eating—especially if you happen to be going to the beach!* Even on business, you want to avoid the uneasiness of a rumbling stomach during your workshop.

Tip #3: Split Meals or Order Half Portions

Most trips involve eating out often, which can be a fun break from cooking. And, c’mon, you have to live a little—it’s not always about eating healthy while traveling. Many restaurants are notorious for serving larger portions than most would want to eat in one meal. The problem is, biologically speaking, we don’t really feel full until 20 to 30 minutes after we eat, which is why it’s so easy to overindulge.

There are a few solutions to this problem:

  • Drink water 10 minutes before the meal. It will help speed up the satiated feeling while eating.
  • Order a half portion, if available. You might not save a lot of money, but it’s better than going overboard.
  • Split the meal with someone else at the table. Request an extra plate to make sharing easier.
  • The last tip, and one I use often, is to get a to-go box at the time the food is served. I’ll split the meal and commit to only eating the portion on the plate. If I wait to get a box, I’m already two-thirds of the way through the plate and will definitely eat more before the box makes its way to the table.

5 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling: Snacks

Tip #4: Snack Often

Keep yourself fueled throughout the day and avoid binge eating by snacking on satisfying, high-protein treats. Have plenty of water and a serving of nuts, berries, cheese, or other satisfying, natural foods between meals to keep yourself at the top of your game. If you decide to go for something processed, like jerky, make sure it’s the healthy kind.

5 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling: Checklist

Tip #5: Utilize the Glycemic Index

In a perfect world, your body would recognize it was in “vacation mode” and adjust how it utilizes the food you eat for energy. Since this is definitely not the case, it’s important to recognize what kinds of foods will help you thrive while on a trip and which ones will leave you feeling tired and unmotivated. One factor to consider is the glycemic index, which determines how much a particular food will affect blood sugar levels.

Processed foods such as white bread, white rice, soda, and raisins cause a sharp rise, then fall, in blood sugar levels. Other foods, like oats, most fruit, peanuts, and carrots, cause a steadier rise in blood sugar levels, meaning a more consistent level of energy throughout the day. Our very own Matt Jaggi wrote a great article breaking down the dos and don’ts behind the glycemic index.

Bonus Tip: Heading Home

5 Tips for Eating Healthy While Traveling: Travel

Even the most amazing adventures must come to an end. When it’s time to head home, what you eat and drink during your final hours of travel could impact how you get back into your daily routine. Some people try to beat jet lag by drinking lots of coffee for extra oomph on the last day of the trip. Caffeine has a half-life of five to six hours on average, meaning you may still be jittery at the end of the day.

As you begin to wind down from your travels, your body might not be on the same page. Avoid stimulants like alcohol, sugar, and caffeine. To help realign yourself back to your natural sleep and wake cycle, try a melatonin supplement like Pure Rest™ for the first night or two back home.*

We might like to add, if you interested in a travel location that has the best of all worlds maybe you should try a trip to Nova Scotia, Canada. Our playground will give you a diverse touch of coastal living, with laid-back hospitality that is warm and friendly. Look us up, and stop by we are sure to make you feel right at home.

Healthy Travels, Friend

Coast Lifestyle, Healthy Cove

Heading to the Farmers Market

There are many reasons to get out and go to the market on the weekend.  East Coast Life Solutions will be at the Alderney Market this coming Saturday, May 5th.  See You There!

A favorite springtime adventure of mine is to tune up the bikes and ride with my wife to the local farmers market. We’re lucky to live in a neighborhood that hosts Friday evening open air markets where local farmers come to sell their goods. It’s a wonderful mixture of vegetables, fruits, cheeses, artisan breads, and local meats. Rounding out the blocked street with booths lining the sidewalk are everything from homemade candles, crêpe stands, and hot roasted coffee to other temporary shops selling handmade goods.

Farmers Market: Veggies

The first thing I notice is the colors. The greens are dark and shiny. The red peppers are vibrant and alive. The yellow squash naturally draws your eye while the cut beets radiate a luxurious purple. Vegetables are packed tightly into cardboard cartons and stacked on pitched boards showcasing the labor of the local farmers. It’s as much a visual sensation as it is flavor packed.

Most of our trips to the farmers market involve picking up items we can build a recipe around. We’ll find fresh arugula and come up with a clever summer salad. If the lamb looks good, we’ll grill chops that evening. And who doesn’t love making peach cobbler out of locally procured peaches and handmade granola?

For example, last summer we were on a mission, and the prize was homemade BLT sandwiches.

The BLT is a classic sandwich made with bacon, lettuce, and tomato on toasted bread with mayonnaise. The smoky saltiness of the bacon is complemented by the crisp lettuce and sweet tomato. Add creamy mayo to toasted brioche bread and you have one of my all-time favorite sandwiches.

We found romaine lettuce, Roma tomatoes, fresh sliced smoked fat back, and brioche bread that was still warm from that morning’s oven (we settled on store-bought mayo but it was still a good haul). Riding home, we built our sandwiches and couldn’t help but notice how much better these sandwiches were. Not only were they delicious, we knew exactly where our food came from. We met the farmers and butchers. We learned their story, and somehow this added to the experience.

Farmers Market

Eat Like a Local

Farm-to-table is a social eating movement that encourages people to eat both regionally and seasonally. Sometimes called “farm to fork,” it largely refers to food made from locally sourced ingredients, often natural or organic. The farm-to-table movement came as a reaction to the processed foods and use of preservatives in the 1950s. Consumers didn’t like not knowing where their food came from. They didn’t know their greengrocer. Butchers were replaced by cooler bins filled with plastic-wrapped meats. The human connection to eating was reduced to running to a supermarket and grabbing boxes of processed grains, eating vegetables grown with pesticides, and buying meats that were raised on hormones.

While grocery shopping became easier and was filled with countless options, consumers were being pushed further away from the farmers as goods were being shipped from around the world. In response to this global trend, people reexamined both their relationship with food and the community in which they purchased it.

Fresh Food Tastes Better

Local food is often more nutritious. Because it’s not shipped long distances, locally grown foods can be healthier and tastier. A study from the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture looked at 16 popular fruits and vegetables and discovered on average all of these foods traveled close to 1,500 miles before being sold. Unripe fruits and vegetables are much more resilient that ripe ones. To keep food from going bad during transit, fruits and veggies are picked before they are completely ripened and able to absorb the maximum amount of nutrients. This is why you’ll see green bananas at the store and you have to wait to eat them.

Farmers Market

The longer vegetables can remain on the vine or tree, the longer they have to convert sun and minerals into the ground into the produce. And that extra time produces more nutrients that taste better. That’s why a bright red tomato off the vine tastes better than the greenish one from the store.

By buying closer to home, you’re eliminating the steps between you and your food. This helps eliminate exposure to pollutants and contamination. Food grown in distant locations has the potential for food safety issues at harvesting, washing, shipping, and distribution.

Local Means Less Gas

Farm-to-table might not save you from eating too many local beans, but it definitely means less trips to the gas station. Considering that the average distance for produce to travel is 1,500 miles, it costs a lot of money to ship food. The average 18-wheeler semi-truck travels about 5 miles per gallon of gas. That means it’ll take 500 gallons of diesel fuel to cover the distance. While energy standards are getting better for large trucks, that’s still a lot of gas to move your vegetables.

Shopping locally won’t save the world, but it will help cut back on carbon emissions.

It’s Good for the Neighborhood

Shopping farmers markets and local merchants is good for the economy. The money that is spent on local farmers and growers all stays close to home and is reinvested with businesses and services in your community. Cutting out the middleman means that local producers don’t have to pay shipping charges. Taxes collected in the community stay in the community.Buying locally can improve the economic vitality of small farms and encourage others to start their own businesses. Buying locally can improve the economic vitality of small farms and encourage others to start their own businesses.

Farmers Market

Look at the Choices

It would be wonderful if strawberries grew year-round. Unless you live around the equator, you’re like the rest of us that wait until mid-summer to get our hands on local grown strawberries. But this isn’t a bad thing. Even areas with shorter growing seasons have interesting and exciting things to eat. This is why getting to know your local growers and producers can be exciting. Listen to them. See what they have to offer. And try the fruits and vegetables that are in season.Farmers Market

You wouldn’t go to Italy for the Kung Pao chicken, so why would you try to get produce out of season at the market? While this isn’t 100 percent practical for feeding your family, especially if you live in a large city or are under budgetary restrictions, a large component of farm-to-table is being conscious of your food choices.

Buy What You Need

An astonishing amount of food is wasted every year in the United States. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an estimated 30–40 percent of all food supplies are thrown away each year.

This number corresponds to approximately 133 billion pounds, or $161 billion worth of food.

Food waste is the single largest component going into municipal landfills.

Coast Lifestyle

HOW STRESS AFFECTS YOUR WEIGHT

stress affects your weight

Your work meeting ran late. Your car wouldn’t start immediately. You’ve hit every red light on the drive home. You realize you have no groceries at the same time hunger hits.

Surely, you’ve experienced a night like this and didn’t handle it gracefully. That’s because when you are experiencing stress—no matter how insignificant—the demands on your mind and body have exceeded the resources you have to cope with them. It’s hard to deal with each stressor when you’re standing at the crossroads of eight different frustrating scenarios.

Some nights like this might be unavoidable. But it’s important to learn about the long-term, negative impacts of stress so you can keep yourself healthy, well, and whole.

A common concern with ill-managed stress is an impact on the ability to maintain a healthy weight. There are a lot of factors that explain how stress affects weight. Your body’s response to stress—the hormones it releases—can impact fat storage. Stress can cause shifts in your microbiome. And, on top of that, the stress eating—turning to comforting, unhealthy foods—used to cope can compound the issues.

Below, you’ll get in-depth explanations of these bodily responses and the vicious stress cycle. But before you explore the impact, let’s discuss the different types of stress and your body’s response to it.

Types of Stress

Short-term stress happens quickly, over a short duration of time. It could be bad traffic or a long line at the store when you’re in a hurry. A short-term stressor might be small, but it’s something you’re able to handle without much difficulty.

Long-term stress is an ongoing battle against your stressor(s). It can be repetitive, continuous situations or conditions that feel insurmountable. For example, a lot of people struggle with crippling debt or maybe going to a job they hate. These types of looming stressors can last for months and even years.

Your body handles these stressors differently. From chemical pathways to behavioral changes, a lot can happen in response to stress. Let’s explore your body’s response to stressors to better understand how you can stay healthy while overcoming life’s obstacles.

The Short-Term Stress Response

Short-term stress happens when your body reacts to a risk, whether it is real or perceived. Let’s say you’re home alone and you hear an unfamiliar sound. Your brain may process this as a risk. You might assume it’s an intruder, even if the sound is not.

Before you determine the sound was just the washing machine, your body goes into “fight or flight” mode. And your adrenal glands secrete the hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine.

These hormones make your body prepared for survival mode, should the need arise. Increased hormone levels elevate your heart rate, blood pressure, and they increase the rate at which fat and carbohydrates in your system are broken down. Basically, these hormones are changing your metabolism to fuel this heightened state to be ready to fight or run away. Once the threat is eliminated, your body can return to its normal state.

The Long-Term Stress Response

Since the exposure to the “risk”—again perceived or real—is prolonged during long-term stress, your body can be strained physically and psychologically. Instead of short-lived spikes in the flight-or-fight hormones, the adrenal glands secrete cortisol, the primary stress hormone.

Cortisol’s presence doesn’t wreak havoc on the body. The strain comes from elevated levels for a prolonged period of time. The body becomes accustomed to these levels, establishing a new baseline tolerance. Consequently, if high stress levels are maintained, the secretions will continue to increase.

High levels of cortisol stimulate your appetite. On top of that, it can influence a rise in insulin levels. Insulin is responsible for regulating blood sugar. As the insulin level raises, blood sugar levels drop. This can create cravings for especially calorie-dense foods to regain a reasonable blood sugar level.

The Vicious Cycle of Stress & Weight Gain

The sequence of events above may not seem that harmful on the surface. However, if cortisol continues to course through your system for days, weeks—even months—on end, a vicious cycle is born. Elevated cortisol leads to increased insulin levels, which leads to lower blood sugar, and finally sugar cravings.

It’s not surprising that if you experience stress without relief, you might reach for “comfort foods” to sustain you. These foods are aptly named. They often supply a lot of energy in the form of refined sugar. They’re rich in fat to boot. And your brain experiences a calming effect from these foods.

In a way, comfort foods provide a short respite from the stress response. But this positively reinforces the frequent consumption of comfort foods. When you experience this relief, it’s likely you’ll reach for a similar food the next time you’re stressed and hungry. If the cycle continues long-term, there are implications for weight gain.

But there’s more to it than the cycle of stress eating. Cortisol activates lipoprotein lipase (LPL), an enzyme responsible for depositing and storing fat. A group of researchers found a correlation between high cortisol levels and central fat accumulation (distribution of fat around the midsection).

The group studied women at rest and subjected them to stress tests. Measurements of participant cortisol levels and psychological responses were taken after each rest or testing session. The researchers found that these correlations back up the existing hypothesis that long-term stress and “stress reactivity” can lead to greater central fat accumulation.

The Impact of Stress on Your Microbiome

A recent study in mice reiterated that stress has physical implications too, not just psychological ones. The researchers took a group of mice and fed half of the male and female mice a high-fat diet and then exposed the entire group to mild stress for a prolonged period of time.

The most notable finding was in the group of female mice not on the high-fat diet. After the stress period, their gut microbiota had changed. Though they were not eating a high-fat diet, their microbiome told a different story. Over time, the bacteria in their gut shifted to resemble that of the mice fed a high-fat diet.

Though this study was conducted in mice, the lessons and implications are clear. First, the biological effects of stress are far-reaching. It affects how you feel emotionally. But stress also changes the body physiologically. Second, the conclusion also implies that eating well alone is not enough to keep your body as healthy as it could be. While diet is important, so is your response to stress.

Tips for Managing Versus Coping with Stress

While they may sound similar, managing and coping with stress are two very distinct behaviors. Management involves planning ahead and building systems of support before stressors become overwhelming. Coping implies a sense of survival or just scraping by during an episode of stress.

Creating a stress-management plan doesn’t have to be stressful—it can be simple! It takes a little bit of forethought and planning, but once in place, it can help you through a hectic day. Consider the list below and think of how to personalize each for your life.

  • Create a support system. You likely already have a network of family and friends. But it’s helpful to pinpoint exactly who in your web can help you and when. And don’t just name them—write them down. It’s easier to reach out for support when a name and number are ready to use.
  • Block out alone time. This actually means time spent alone—free from distractions and visitors. You’re encouraged to physically block out these times on your calendar, too. This way colleagues or family can’t schedule over your time to recharge. If you’re a busy person, don’t give this up if you don’t have a free hour. Even five minutes alone can help.
  • Prioritize your tasks. It’s always gratifying to check off items on a to-do list. But often the easiest tasks get checked first, leaving the larger, more important tasks waiting for too long. Be honest with yourself when creating and prioritizing your list.
  • Make time for self-care. This doesn’t necessarily mean treating yourself in the way of bubble baths and bon-bons. It means actually taking care of yourself by eating balanced meals, sleeping well, and exercising, to name a few. Taking care of your body shouldn’t be a luxury, so make these self-care pieces a priority.
  • Be active! Exercise can intimidate some, but it can be enjoyable if you tailor it to your interests. Whether it be a leisurely walk or a vigorous game of soccer, both are valid options for getting your body moving. Research has shown that regular exercise can lower cortisol levels and boost endorphins.

Thanks to Ienna Templeton